↓ Archives ↓

Technology’s effect on religion

Today being Good Friday, with Easter being Sunday and in the midst of Passover; it is a time for reflection. Instead of thinking about DevOps, today I ponder life and religion. What comes to mind is the future of religion in these technological times. The number of Americans with a religious affiliation continues to decline, less and less of us make an appearance at a Synagogue, Church or any house of worship for that matter. In my childhood we would at the very least make an appearance a few holidays a year, notably at the annual pancake breakfast. From the calculator to the computer, from mobile devices and the Internet, advances in technology are creating monumental changes in our lives and in turn the way religion is practiced.  The universal acceptance of mobile devices, like the iPhone and iPad, is provoking a profound social change. The dependence on these devices is eliminating the individuals need for traditional religion and going to traditional houses of worship. The problem is, without the...

The post Technology’s effect on religion appeared first on DevOps.com.

DevOps adoption can succeed where ITIL failed, if we let it

When I look at the future of DevOps adoption and acceleration I contrast it with what I feel was the failure of ITIL to really move beyond large enterprise IT shops. I am of the firm belief that DevOps has the legs to succeed and soar where ITIL sort of crashed and burned. OK if not crashed and burned, at least sputtered out. To understand why I feel this way, let me share a little personal history with you. ITIL demands you to come to IT I remember my first ITIL project. I was working at a large retailer and I was asked to help our IT department understand what this ITIL thing was and to help drive adoption of some of ITIL’s basic concepts. First on the list was to get a service catalog up and running. In the space of just a few weeks, I realized the main barriers to adoption and helped our IT executive team understand that getting IT consumers to understand, much less embrace an...

The post DevOps adoption can succeed where ITIL failed, if we let it appeared first on DevOps.com.

Why Vertical Collaboration Matters for DevOps

Vertical collaboration is defined by Rick Defour as a team of people working interdependently toward a common goal for which they are all mutually accountable. Now that everyone is clear on the importance of collaboration and the different types, it’s time to delve into the importance of one type of collaboration in particular: vertical. Vertical collaboration is defined by Rick Defour as a team of people working interdependently toward a common goal for which they are all mutually accountable. You can find examples of vertical collaboration in educational settings where teachers of different levels work together to insure student success and in manufacturing settings where the supplier & retailer can better leverage themselves to enhance the bottom line for both. When you think of vertical collaboration in the tech space, the example of a dev team pushing out code is a good one. Each dev has a different area of specialty but they must work together in order to implement the new feature. Taking this into consideration then, it’s easy...

The post Why Vertical Collaboration Matters for DevOps appeared first on DevOps.com.

Q & A: Speaking DevOps and Threat Modeling with the author of Threat Modeling: Designing for Security

If you want to understand how to threat model systems and applications in most any environment you turn to someone who has done so. That’s why we took 30 minutes to speak with Adam Shostack. Adam is responsible for security development lifecycle threat modeling at Microsoft and he is one of the very few threat modeling experts in the world. We thought, with more and more organizations moving toward DevOps and Continuous Deployment, would be a great time to discuss how this impacts the design of secure software. Earlier this year Adam published his book, Threat Modeling: Designing for Security, available here. The book provides pragmatic and actionable advice on how to make security an integral part of systems, software, or services from the outset. This advice applies to systems and development teams both big and small and is especially crucial as application deployment times accelerate. DevOps.com:Why threat modeling? What benefits does it provide the business as well as the application development and operations teams? Adam Shostack: For the business,...

The post Q & A: Speaking DevOps and Threat Modeling with the author of Threat Modeling: Designing for Security appeared first on DevOps.com.

Delivering Delight At ChefConf 2014

Chef CEO Barry Crist stirs the pot to open ChefConf 2014 The theme from ChefConf 2014 is stirring delight and if you listened to Barry Crist during todays opening keynote, then you would know its more appropriately “F****ing Delight”.  Amidst high energy, loud music and a smattering of exciting expletives, Barry Crist called for attendees to stir delight in their enterprises using DevOps methodologies and, of course, Chef. Crist defined delight when the customer’s experience exceeds expectations.  Using Uber as an example when traveling in New York, he joked that the influx of Uber cars was so high that it took only 30 seconds for him to wait for a ride.  And what more he didn’t have to deal with payment when exiting the car at the airport.  In short, the service not only provided the expected functionality of something as simple as a car ride, but provided a delightful experience.  The new economy, we are part of he said, is the “delight economy”.  And the call to action for...

The post Delivering Delight At ChefConf 2014 appeared first on DevOps.com.

Docker is red hot at Red Hat

The news from the Red Hat Summit this weeks almost appears to be all Docker all the time.  A series of announcements has made Docker clearly the container of choice for Red Hat users. But don’t stop at just Red Hat. Docker has pretty much locked down all of the major Linux distros including Amazon’s AWS Linux version with more on the way. More on this on Network World here. Here is a recap of the news: http://blog.docker.io/2014/04/docker-red-hat-even-more-goodness/ Expansion of RHEL 7.0 Beta to include Docker container technologies.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is currently in beta and is targeted to be a Red Hat certified container host, with Docker as a primary supported container format; Docker Integration with OpenShift PaaS.  Application containers in OpenShift will be integrated with Docker and support Red Hat certified ISV applications packaged in the Docker container format. These same containerized applications will also be supported on other Red Hat products; Red Hat Certification.  As revealed last month, Red Hat is launching certification of applications delivered in...

The post Docker is red hot at Red Hat appeared first on DevOps.com.

DevOps killed the developer star

The DevOps blogosphere is aflame over Jeff Knupp’s post on “How DevOps is killing the Developer”. While I agree with Knupp’s premise that DevOps, Agile and other technology trends are allowing (is forcing more accurate?) developers to do more outside of pure development, even turning into “full stack” developers, I disagree that this is a bad thing. I disagree with Knupp’s assertion that developers are the Orcas of the IT world sitting atop the food chain as the top dogs.  I think Knupp consciously or not, degraded the very real, important and hard job that ops people perform, DBAs do every day, as well as everyone else at an organization. Reading this I was reminded on one time I was sitting in an executive meeting and the VP of engineering actually had the stones to say that his developers were smarter than the rest of the people in the organization and worked harder to boot.  Now that is a real team builder right there. One thing I have learned in...

The post DevOps killed the developer star appeared first on DevOps.com.

An outage war room primer

One aspect of the DevOps movement I’ve seen adopted at numerous companies is the idea that everyone supports their products by being on-call for any incidents that occur in the production environment. This responsibility often leads to participation in the outage war room. For those of you who may be new to this experience, I’m offering this primer from a grey-hair ops guy who’s served countless hours in every manner of war room you could imagine, some that stretch the bounds of that imagination, and a few that I just still can’t talk about. Been there. Done that. Still doing it. In all that time, however, I’ve observed  four distinct war room dynamics that can cause conflict. Understanding how that conflict arises is key to mitigating it. The war room is a stressful place This statement sounds obvious, but it’s fundamental to understanding the tensions that can arise in a war room. The clock is ticking. In fact, the clock has already been ticking for some time when you join...

The post An outage war room primer appeared first on DevOps.com.

Microsoft bridges the gap between Azure and DevOps

DevOps can be easy for a startup. Many of the concepts and principles of DevOps come quite naturally to a fresh company just getting started. It’s a different story, however, for large, established enterprises trying to wrap their arms around this DevOps thing. For IT admins working in Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform, though, things just got a lot easier thanks to the integration of Chef and Puppet Labs. Many organizations are heavily invested in the Microsoft ecosystem. IT teams and administrators are familiar with Windows domains, Active Directory, Hyper-V, and Azure. They know how to write scripts and leverage PowerShell to get things done, but they’re much less familiar with the core principles of DevOps, or common DevOps automation tools like Chef and Puppet Labs. One of the driving forces of DevOps is the ability—or perhaps necessity—to automate those tasks that can be automated so IT resources are freed up to focus on more important tasks. Deploying and configuring virtual servers and applications is necessary, but it can also be...

The post Microsoft bridges the gap between Azure and DevOps appeared first on DevOps.com.

Nagios is not a monitoring strategy

When I visit clients to talk about DevOps, I usually ask them what their monitoring strategy is. Too often, the answer I hear is “We use Nagios”. I think Nagios is a great tool, but it sure is not a strategy. Nagios does a good job of monitoring infrastructure. It will alert you when you are running out of disk, CPU, or memory. I call this reactive monitoring. In other words, Nagios is telling you that your resources are getting maxed out and you are about to have issues. Proactive monitoring focuses more on the behavior of the applications and attempts to detect when metrics are starting to stray away from their normal baseline numbers. Proactive monitoring alerts you that the system is starting to experience symptoms that can lead to a degradation of performance or capacity issues which is more preferable than Nagios telling you are about to be screwed. With reactive monitoring, it is not uncommon that customers start complaining about the same time that the Nagios alerts...

The post Nagios is not a monitoring strategy appeared first on DevOps.com.